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How To Be The Worst Type of Marketing Client

I asked a few of my colleagues what repeated client actions frustrate them and here’s a small list…

Take really long to make decisions

Most of the time, there are forks in the road where a decision can have a significant impact on the progress of the project.

Here’s an example:

Sometimes a planned software won’t be good enough for the objective.

I had one instance when a client’s merchant service no longer would be the best solution for a particular product sale.

Well, we’ve presented the options to the client and they not only did they open the email and click (yes, we can track all of these things) they just dismissed it.  After several days of sending “Checking In…” emails, something happened that triggered them to realize how important this was for the launch.

We couldn’t move forward with the project without this decision and well, the launch was delayed.

Negotiate price on anything and everything you can

That’s right, in a time where “everything is negotiable” always say you don’t have the funds for that or you didn’t anticipate the price would be that high. Nothing says “I don’t think you’re services are worth that price” than by always trying to negotiate.

Demand everything is completed within a specific budget even after major modifications
You know how you had one idea in your head, then when you heard this podcast, talk to a friend/colleague and they shared how they had success with another way to do it?

Well, that whole shift (yes, it is a shift) is a whole new route and we essentially have to scrap all the work that was done to start all over.

Oh, you’re not going to use what has been created?  Yea, I guess you’re right since you’re not going to use it, why should you pay for it?

All of the hours we spent on your project, it doesn’t matter.  We’ll just reset the time and act as if we haven’t done anything.

Don’t accept responsibility for your actions (or lack thereof)

I mean, why would you?  The customer is always right and when you didn’t do what you said you’d do (even after you signed the contract agreement) it’s just easier to say “I’m not the expert in this field, I’m counting on you to guide me.” even after countless emails, text messages and phone calls.

Just, pass the buck.

Be cryptic with your responses

This is fun.  

We love spending our time trying to decode your reasons.  

So, we apologize in advance for frustrating you when we ask for clarification, especially when “we should already know this stuff.”

Expect an immediate response to all of your inquiries (especially throughout the day)

Let’s say you’re driving and a question popped up in your head.  You hit a red light, so you take advantage and send a quick email with your question.

You get back to driving and get into the office.

You check your inbox and notice that you still don’t have a response.

Send the following text “I sent an email, did you get it???? Is everything ok????”  (Yes, add those multiple question marks)

How dare you not receive an immediate response???? (See what I did there???? ok.. ok I’ll stop )

Book days and times and show up late (or never at all)

This one is great.  Here we are, standing by to speak with you to discuss whatever we need to discuss, especially since you booked the day and time.  I must admit, sometimes we welcome having an unexpected break but this is the part where we just get confused.

If you show up for a meeting that is supposed to take 30 – 45 minutes.  You show up 15 minutes late. We can’t continue the call, wanna know why?

Well, because your questions, comments, and concerns usually need the full 30-45 minutes to cover them.

Let’s reschedule.

Oh no!  The next time we can talk about it is next week?!  That’s too long? Ok, let me just move everyone else on my calendar because you showed up late (or just missed the meeting altogether).  I’m sure everyone else will understand.

 

 

Do you agree? What would you add?  

 

Let me know in the comments below.